Today In Music History – February 25th.

Marty Miller
0
226
  • 56
    Shares

Every day on Radio Nova, just before 11am, we play a couple of songs key to “today in music history” Have a listen! But for now – here’s some light reading and watching.  February 25th in Music History looks like this.

1972, Led Zeppelin appeared in front of over 25,000 fans at the Western Springs Stadium, Auckland, New Zealand, the group’s first ever gig in New Zealand, (and the largest crowd ever to attend a concert on the island). A special train was chartered from Wellington to bring fans to the concert. News reviews the next day reported the band could be heard over five miles from the Stadium.

Advertisement

1977, The Jam signed to Polydor Records UK for £6,000!! They went on to have 18 consecutive Top 40 singles in the UK, from their debut in 1977 to their break-up in December 1982, including four No.1 hits. Not a bad investment by Polydor!

1984, ‘Jump’, by Van Halen started a five-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart, a No.7 hit on our side of the Atlantic. Singer David Lee Roth wrote the lyrics after seeing a television news report about a man who was threatening to commit suicide by jumping off a building.

2004, The Rolling Stones topped a US Rich List of music’s biggest money makers. The list was based on earnings during 2003 when the band played their ‘Forty Licks’ tour, which made them $212 million, in ticket, CD, DVD and merchandise sales. The three million fans who went to the shows spent an average of $11 each on merchandise. Bruce Springsteen was listed in second place and The Eagles in third.

2009, President Obama honoured Stevie Wonder his musical hero, with America’s highest award for pop music, the Library of Congress’ Gershwin prize at a ceremony at the White House. The president said the Motown legend had been the soundtrack to his youth and he doubted that his wife would have married him if he hadn’t been a fan. Imagine a performance like this around at your house!

This should have been included in Alanis Morrisette’s IRONIC, in 2015, On what would have been George Harrison’s 72nd birthday, a new tree was planted in his memory in Griffith Park Los Angeles to replace one that was earlier killed by a beetle infestation.

 Don’t forget you can now get This Week in Music History every Friday from Nova.ie and Radio Nova.

To subscribe to the podcast, just click here